Nipont Industrial Co., Limited,Changsha,Hunan,China the birthplace of saws,M42 Bimetal band saw blades,bimetal band saw strip, nipont bimetal band saw blades,RBO / R80 Bimetal band saw blades,band saw blade for metal, band sawing machine, bimetal band saw blade welding machine,UBN-8 flash butt welder, tel: 0086-731-85810581
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FAQ
  Bandsaw Blades FAQ:

1. How should the guides be set on a vertical machine?
2. Should I use cutting fluid with a bandsaw?

3. How can I tell when I am using the correct feed rate?

4. My band saw is cutting crooked. What’s wrong?

5. Why are cracks forming on my blade?
6. How do I reverse the direction of the teeth on the blade?
7. How do I cut bundles of stock?
8. I don't know what blade length I require, is there a way of working this out?


1. How should the guides be set on a vertical machine?
First you should tension the blade correctly as per your manufacturer's manual. The back and side guides should then be simply moved in to only just touch the blade and so as not to move the blade away from its natural path.

2. Should I use cutting fluid with a bandsaw?
If you use your bandsaw to cut metal, then a good cutting fluid (with extreme pressure additives) is vital to prolong the lifespan of the blade. There are very few metals which do not require cutting fluid and it should be used with virtually all steel and steel alloy products. It is necessary to choose between a water soluble fluid or a neat cutting fluid, particularly when bi-metal blades are being used. It is generally more economical to use water soluble fluid where the materials being cut fall into the low carbon, low alloy, general purpose category. Better results will be achieved with neat cutting oil where high carbon, high alloy and stainless steels are being cut. Sufficient fluid should be used to ensure the work piece is kept cool and to flush swarf from the blades teeth. Insufficient fluid will allow the work piece to warm up and allow swarf to cling to the blade causing choking and the teeth to strip. Usually cast iron which should be cut dry and aluminium which should be cut with power paraffin.

3. How can I tell when I am using the correct feed rate?
Chips are the best clue to feed rate, look for the following characteristics:
  1. If the chips are powdery, increase the feed.
  2. If they are free-curling and not discoloured, the feed is just right.
  3. If they have a blue colour (burned chips), reduce the feed.Increase the feed rate to take bigger chips.
  4. Increase the speed - more teeth pass through the cut per minute .
  5. Use a blade with coarser teeth - more teeth penetrate with greater gullet capacity .
  6. Use hook tooth blade - positive rake causes teeth to dig in
4. My band saw is cutting crooked. What’s wrong?
It’s time to replace your band saw blade.

5. Why are cracks forming on my blade?

This is called blade fatigue and is caused by improper tension or head weight.

6. How do I reverse the direction of the teeth on the blade?

Sometimes when you uncoil a new blade you will notice that the teeth are going the wrong way for your saw. Put on safety glasses and gloves and hold the blade in front of you with the teeth pointing toward you. Turn the blade inside out by simply flipping the teeth away from you.

7. How do I cut bundles of stock?

Use our clamping device.

8.
I don't know what blade length I require, is there a way of working this out?

Yes there is, for two wheel bandsaws the following procedure can be followed:
  1. Adjust the wheels to their correct position (about the middle of the adjustment range)
  2. Referring to the diagram below, measure the distance between the center point of each wheel. (measurement D) .
  3. Now measure the radius of each wheel. (R1 and R2) .
  4. Use this formula to calculate the band length from the measurements you have taken:
    Band length = (R1 x 3.1416) + (R2 x 3.1416) + (2 x D) .
  5. Ensure the wheels are not adjusted to their extremes, you need to allow for take-up to tension the band and also for possible future blade re-welding. Around the middle of the adjustment range is best.

 Below are some popular sizes for bandsaws
Common Sizes Bandsaw Blades
19mm(3/4") x 0.9mm (.35)---------8,5/8,4/6tpi ------------0 degree
27mm(1") x 0.9mm(.35) -----------6,4,5/8,4/6,3/4tpi------0 degree 3/4,2/3tpi---7 degree
34mm(1-1/4") x 1.06mm(.042) ---6, 4, 4/6, 3/4tpi --------0 degree 3/4, 2/3tpi ---7 degree
41mm(1-5/8") x1.25mm(.050)-----4/6,3/4tpi---------------0 degree 3/4, 2/3tpi ----7 degree
54mm x 1.6mm ----------------------1tpi----------------------1 degree
67mm x 1.6mm ----------------------1tpi----------------------1 degree


 
 
 
 
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